Weekly Schedule of Reading & Listening

n.b. The following plan is subject to change. Please consult the Moodle for final decisions on readings, assignments and deadlines. 

ONE: WHAT WAS SOCIALISM…?

2/1   Introduction: Engineering Human Souls

  • Zhdanov, excerpt from 1934 speech defining “Socialist Realism”
  • In-class: excerpts from The Communist Manifesto (Marx and Engels) and Modern Social Imaginaries (Taylor)

2/3   Marxism & Music

  • Moore, “Introduction: Music and the Arts in Socialist Cuba,” pp. 1-25.
  • Zemtsovsky, “Musicological Memoirs on Marxism,” pp. 167-189.

UNIT ONE: THE SOVIET UNION 

TWO: MAKING MARXIST-LENINIST MUSIC

2/8   Inventing Soviet Socialist Music: the 1920s

  • Excerpts from Frolova-Walker and Walker, Music and Soviet Power, 1917-1932
    •                    “Preface” (ix-xix)
    •                    “Art and the Proletariat” (21-22)
    •                    “Musical Responses” (32-33)
    •                    “A Letter from Komsomol Members…” (175-178)
    •                    “Bartok and the Problem of Folk Music” (230-237)
    •                    “The Rules Change” (314-323
    •                    “On the Restructuring…” (324-325)
    •                    “On the Music Front” (326-327)

2/10   “National in Form, Socialist in Content”

  • Frolova-Walker, “’National in Form, Socialist in Content’: Musical Nation-Building in the Soviet Republics,” pp. 331-337
  • Levin, “Making Marxist-Leninist Music in Uzbekistan,” pp. 190-203.

 

THREE: SOCIALIST REALISM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

2/15   The Art of Fear

  • Anon., Chaos Instead of Music,” Pravda, January 28, 1936.
  • Ross, “The Art of Fear: Music in Stalin’s Russia,” pp. 215-259.
  • Werth, “When the ‘Formalists’ were ‘Genuises,’” 17-23.

2/17    Musicologists on Trial

  • Werth, “The Arbiter of the Arts,” “Zhdanov meets the Musicians” and the “Conference of Musicians at the Central Committee of All-Union Communist Party Moscow: January 1948,” pp. 35-103.

         * In-class excerpts of Testimony

FOUR: SOVIET UNDERGROUND  

2/22   Sonic Samizdat

  • Daughtry, J. Martin. 2009. “’Sonic Samizdat’: Situating Unofficial Recording in the Post-Stalinist Soviet Union.” Poetics Today 30 (1): 27-65.

2/24   Imagining the West

FIVE: ROCKING THE STATE

2/29 Rock on Bones

3/2   Soviet Punk

  • Steinholt, “Siberian punk shall emerge here: Egor Letov and Grazhdanskaia Oborona,” pp. 401-415.
  • Zhuk, “The Komsomol Magazine Rovesnik and the Ideology of Pop Music” and “Antipunk Campaigns, Antifascist Hysteria, and Human Rights Problems,” pp. 239-279
  • Listen: How Rock and Roll Brought the Soviet Union Down,PRI’s The World

 

SIX: ALL THAT IS SOLID MELTS INTO AIR

3/7   From Late to Post-Soviet

  • Wanner, “Nationalism on Stage: Music and Change in Soviet Ukraine,” pp. 136-155.
  • Yurchak, “Gagarin and the Rave Kids: Transforming Power, Identity, and Aesthetics in the Post-Soviet Night Life,” pp. 76-109.

3/9   ***Exam on USSR**

UNIT TWO: CHINA

SEVEN: MAO MEETS MARX AND LENIN

3/14 Making People’s Music

3/16 Elevating the Folk

  • Lau, “Constructing National Music” (ch. 2), pp. 30-55
  • Mu, “Academic Ignorance or Political Taboo? Some Issues in China’s Study of its Folk Song Culture,” pp. 303-320.

EIGHT: SPRING RECESS!

NINE: INVENTING CHINESE REVOLUTIONARY MUSIC

3/28 Symbolic Localities 

  • Lau, “Regional Musics with the National Soundscape” (ch. 3), pp. 59-85
  • Jones, “Mass Music and the Politics of Phonographic Realism,” pp. 103-136.

3/30 The East is Red

  • Lau, “Musical Interfaces between East and West” (ch. 4), pp. 86-112
  • Lee, “The ‘East is Red’ Goes Pop: Commodification, Hybridity and Nationalism in Chinese Popular Song,” pp. 95-110.
  • * Screening of Farewell My Concubine in Weis Cinema, time & place tbd.

TEN: MUSIC AS PROPAGANDA

4/4   Socialism with Chinese Characteristics

  • Lau, “Music and Ideology” (ch. 5) and 6, pp. 117-139
  • Perris, “Music as Propaganda: Art at the Command of Doctrine in the People’s Republic of China,” pp. 1-28.

4/6   Compliant Performers, Subversive Performance?

  • Baranovitch, Nimrod. “Compliance, Autonomy, and Resistance of a “State Artist,” pp. 173-212. 

ELEVEN: WORKERS OF THE WORLD, UNITE!

4/11 ***Exam on China***

UNIT THREE: CUBA

4/13 Revolución Cubana  

TWELVE: INSITUTIONALIZING CUBAN SOCIALISM

4/18 Amo Esta Isla!

  • Moore, “Artistic Institutions, Initiatives, and Policies” and “Dance Music and the Politics of Fun,” pp 80-134.

4/20 Canción Protesta

  • Moore, “Transformations in Nueva Trova” and “Afro-Cuban Folklore in a Raceless Society,” pp. 135-196.

THIRTEEN: MUSIC & IDEOLOGICAL CRISIS

4/25 Socialist Santería

  • Moore, “Ay, Dios Ampárame” and “Music and Ideological Crisis,” pp. 197-250.

4/27 Cold War Kids

  • Moore, “Conclusion: Musical Politics into the New Millenium,” pp. 251-264.
  • Vasquez, “Cold War Kids in Concert,” pp. 203-234.

 

FOURTEEN: THE SOUNDS OF LATE CUBAN SOCIALISM

5/2   Advising Day. No class.

5/4   Resistance or Compliance?

  • Baker, “Cuba Rebelión: Underground Music in Havana,” pp. 1-38.
  • Astley, “Porno Para Ricardo,” pp. 455-472

 

FIFTEEN: EAST OF HAVANA

5/9   East of Havana film – in-class screening

5/11 ***Exam on Cuba***

 

SIXTEEN.

5/16   …And What Comes Next?

  • Miller and Yúdice, “Command Cultures and the Postcolonial,” pp. 107-145.

5/18   Final papers due by noon to msonevyt@bard.edu