Tag: Trevor Paglen

New Outlook on Singularity and Technologization, Through Artist-Activist Lens

What is of greater import than the commercial uses of dataveillance is its methods. Martial costs are obscured by commerce’s benefits. We see the sunny side of a demented coin. Dataveillance tranquilizes and propagates ignorance and immobility in the guise of user-friendly interfaces. We seemingly keep ourselves where potential oppressors want us, in the crowd of proletariat workers occasionally exercising…

Spectatorship in an Age of Surveillance

This week as part of our conversations about digital proliferation and surveillance we’re attending parts of the Spectatorship in an Age of Surveillance symposium in Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts. It’s co-sponsored by the Theater & Performance Program, Live Arts Bard, Experimental Humanities, and Film & Electronic Arts, with support from the American Society for Theatre Research. You can…

Group C: Illegal Art in Shadow States

Two contradictory motifs have been growing in culture and political conversation in recent decades: surveillance and secrecy. While governments expand their capabilities to see and observe, sifting through metadata for needles in haystacks (all to protect the horses and cows, they say), they simultaneously insist upon a growing need for opacity in law enforcement and agency operations. Perhaps these arguments…

Group C: Art and Reproduction

  I was really interested in Trevor Paglen’s view on space and intimacy a photograph has with its viewer and how this relates to Walter Benjamin’s view on the loss of authenticity a work has during its reproduction.   When you make a nice print and put in on a wall, you’re creating a space where people can devote a…

Group C: Politics of Production

In Julian Stallabrass’s Negative Dialects in the Google Era: A Conversation with Trevor Paglen, we get to view an in-depth analysis of Paglen’s unique artwork as well as his thoughts on art in general and it’s relationship to the increasing technology.  A specific portion of the article focuses on Paglen’s thoughts on “Politics of Production” (Stallabrass, pg. 7).  This idea is…