Category: Response posts

Group D: Race and Snow Crash

“‘In new media lingo, to ‘transcode’ something is to translate it into another format. The computerization of culture gradually accomplishes similar transcoding in relation to all cultural categories and concepts” (Nakamura, 318). We saw ourselves as machines with the introduction of the assembly line, as reproducible and replaceable parts of the industrial revolution. Now, our perception has shifted to see…

Group D The End of the Book

On hackers: “They descend below this surface layer and into the netherworld of code and tangled nam-shubs that supports it, where everything that you see in the Metaverse, no matter how lifelike and beautiful and three-dimensional, reduces to a simple text file: a series of letters on an electronic page”(350) — I felt like this passage exemplified some of the…

a lot of thoughts that might not make sense – Group D

  First, I wanted to write that I am struggling with the words ‘necropolitics’ and ‘necropower’ because they appear redundant. Necro- is the prefix meaning death, but adding ‘death’ symbol to ‘politicals’ or ‘power’ symbol might be repetitive because I feel like death is embedded in power and politics from their configuration?? Is the use of this prefix to emphasize…

Shifting and Passing: A Form of Identity

“Shifting is a form of communication, of media, because anything that can change state can carry information, and further, the transformation of bodies is often facilitated by the addition of technologies to a body, such as administered hormones or lipstick.” “What matters most is not the moment of being opaque or invisible, or the moment of being visible and therefore…

Group C: Queer Linguistics and Slurs in the Digital Era

As society develops, language adapts. New eras bring new experiences, technology, and phenomena impossible to describe within existing lexicon, so it expands. Nakamura describes this in terms of computers, but people constantly introduce all kinds of “new phrases and terms to describe concepts they wish to introduce to the critical conversation” (317). I find this early point in her essay…

“Troublesome Categories” and the Issue of Erasure

In “Cybertyping and the Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction” Lisa Nakamura demonstrates the pseudo-utopic ideal of a post-racialized internet to be just that: a pseudo-utopia. Nakamura notes that cyberspace tends to treat identity politics of race and gender as “troublesome categories,” (Nakamura, 323), just as advertisements on digital platforms work to “deconstruct the notion of a…

Dating and Hookup Culture as Cybertyping

Lately, I have been very interested in the language that is used to describe bodies in a romantic and sexual context as a way to project conventional beauty standards. On dating and hookup apps, this language prevails in what Manovich would describe as the technical aspect — deriving from the “infrastructure” — which influences the “content” (Nakamura 318). Although Nakamura…

Stereotypes and Cybertypes in the internet and video games

In Lisa Nakaruma’s, Cybertyping and the Work of Race in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, the author brings out a distinct concept that perhaps doesn’t come out a lot in the issues of race (or at least not often as I know it).  Cybertyping as Nakaruma calls it, is “the distinctive ways that the Internet propagates, disseminates and commodifies images of race…

Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto,” Affinity and Identity, and Wishing I took LIT3046

Originally published in 1985, Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto exists as a major work of late 20th century feminist discourse, and offers challenging however highly interesting and influential ideas regarding the roles of feminism and feminists in science, technology, and socialism. It’s amusing that in this version offered to me, editor Simon During’s author’s note poses a question and intentionally does not…

Cyborgism: Haraway, Huxtable and New Feminism

Virtual online worlds have revolutionized our communities due to their global reach and also their disembodiment. I believe that part of why the LGBTQ and feminist communities have developed such a vast and thriving online life is the fact that the Internet is severed from the body. It presents a reality distinct from the physical, and as such attracts people…