Category: Responses

Lee Perry Benedict Anderson nationalism response

Benedict Anderson approaches the idea of nationalism in a way that is similar but different from the way we typically view nationalism. I interpret nationalism as the connection between people through the primary support of the nation they belong too. However, Anderson’s view of nationalism is quite interesting because he defines it as in imagined community because of how not everybody knows…

Sorrell- Anderson and nationality

Anderson defines nationalism as “an imagined political community – and imagined as both inherently limited and sovereign” (Anderson 6). A nation is more of an idea than a tangible thing. While a country is defined by physical borders, a nation is intangible. Since it is intangible, nationalism can come to exist only through shared cultural artifacts. The community that exists is…

Zac Strauss in class response

Anderson’s writing seeks to point out the misconceptions of Nationalism that people like to form. He claims that nationalism seems to be an inherent quality of our species despite the fact that it is a relatively new concept. He also writes about how nationalism is a hard term to define since it means something different for every country; yet people…

Anderson In Class Writing

Anderson defines nationalism as  an imagined political community that is limited and sovereign.  The political community could never actually be cohesive, but their is an imagined cohesion through historical artifacts.   Anderson’s argument is that nationalism was historically shaped.   In order to understand nationalism, we have to focus on when/how it was conceived.  Anderson argues that nationalism was created by multiple historical…

Noah’s Response to Benedict Anderson

It would seem that Anderson concerns himself with the function of nation-ness in society. By claiming that his “point of departure is that nationality, or, as one might prefer to put it in view of that word’s multiple significations, nationness, as well as nationalism, are cultural artefacts of a particular kind” (4), he means to point out the flaw in…

Anderson Response

Anderson defines nationalism as being an imagined community; more specifically, that a nation   “is imagined because the members of even the smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet them, or even hear of them, yet in the minds of each lives the image of their communion.”(6) He argues that the imagined communities are reinforced through a reproducibility…

Notes on Benedict Anderson

In Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson My point of departure is that nationality, or, as one might prefer to put it in view of that word’s multiple significations, nationness, as well as nationalism, are cultural artefacts of a particular kind. (4) He believes that a nation is a an imagined political community that is by nature limited and sovereign. The concept…

In class response McManus

Anderson talks about nationalism from the context of the outsiders or the colonizers describing their perception of the colonized and the imposition of new border lines. He is careful to understand that there is never 100% representation as to how members of nations see themselves and that nonparticipants are added into the mass national collective. Maps and museums play the…

Response to “Imagined Communities” Chapter

Walter Benjamin argues that modern technologies (like the printing press and photography), capitalism, and anthropological colonial projects enabled states to “reproduce” culture a certain way, whose representation was disseminated to the masses and became the hegemonic way that we have come to understand ourselves and who we are in relation to “others” (182). Therefore, these technologies create a “cohesiveness” within the…

Nationalism as a fabricated truth

Nationalism, according to Anderson, is an imagined community that comes together through shared cultural artifacts. When nationalism first emerged in the 19th century, it was viewed as having historical significance dating from some distant immemorial time. Anderson doesn’t consider this to be a lie so much as a fabricated truth. If people believe that the nation existed and find a…